Bouldering video from Fontainebleau October 2010

I’ve just uploaded a bouldering video from our trip to Fontainebleau October 2010. Enjoy!

Fontainebleau 2010 from Ola on Vimeo.

Fontainebleau is located about 60 km south of Paris. It is a well known bouldering area. I want to show how it is to climb there. You walk around in a beautiful forest all days. With many other people. Whole families are out in the forest. Having coffee. Playing with their kids. Seniors climbing harder than you ever will be able to. I love it so.

Also. See my photos from Fontainebleau.

This video contains problems from mostly the blue circuits in

Music

Combine Time Lapses with standard DV – Avidemux and Sony Vegas

I’ve just gone trough some hoops to import a time lapse video made in Avidemux into my standard DV project in Sony Vegas. My first issue was to find a suitable video format and the second to get the size of the time lapse video to match the size of the DV format. I’ll go through all steps in an example project below. I’ll use a time lapse with 14 stills and a DV project (PAL, 720×576, 4:3) with one clip.

Sequence the filenames
Avidemux is a bit picky that the file names of the images are in a sequence. I use ReNamer to automatically serialize the images.

I use ReNamer to serialize file names
I use ReNamer to serialize file names

Making the time lapse video in Avidemux
Even though Sony Vegas can import still images I prefer Avidemux for my time lapses.

Open the first image in Avidemux and make sure all frames are visible in the video. Since I’m going to export the video to Sony Vegas I want to use a format that preserves as much quality as possible. I chose Huffyuv.

Select the frame rate you want. I choose 5 fps.

My time lapse images are in 640 x 480 px and my DV stream is in 720 x 576. I’ll resize the images to 768 x 576 px, then I crop 24 px on each side to get a 720 x 576 px image.

Scale the time lapse images in Avidemux
Scale the time lapse images in Avidemux

Save your time lapse video to avi.

To be able to play the video (in Windows Media Player) I had to install a codec for Huffyuv. I installed the latest ffdshow and selected to install Huffyuv only. I also had to enable Huffyuv in ffdshows VFW configuration utility.

Enable the correct codec
Compare the black border in the preview window with the next screenshot

Now you should be able to play the file in Windows Media Player and it’s time to import the video to Sony Vegas!

Import to Sony Vegas and fix the size problem
I start by just adding my two files to Vegas and preview them. I can see a black border around my time lapse file. I fiddeled around quite a while with this. I tried to resize the time lapse in Event Pan/Crop -tool but could only get that to work if I dissabled Maintain aspect ration.

Compare the black border in the preview window with the next screenshot
Compare the black border in the preview window with the next screenshot
See the black border on the left and right hand side in the preview window. Time lapse video has wrong pixel aspect ratio.
See the black border on the left and right hand side in the preview window. Time lapse video has wrong pixel aspect ratio.

Finally I found out that the pixel aspect ratio differs from my DV file and my time lapse file. On the DV file it’s set to 1,0926 (PAL DV) and on the time lapse it’s set to 1,0000 (Square). I changed it by right clicking on the media, select properties and it’s in the media tab.

Media properties for DV file
Media properties for DV file
Media properties for time lapse file
Media properties for time lapse file

You are done!

Big thanks fo LoRd_Mulder and DarkZell666 in the Avidemux forum for helping me out!

Logitech QuickCam mod to fit a standard tripod

I have a Logitech QuickCam Communicate Deluxe webcam. It’s a decent webcam apart from the non standard mounting holes. I wanted it to fit a standard tripod so I did some modding. Here is how.

Webcam before mod
Logitechs "flexible clip" - not flexible at all if you ask me...

I started out by splitting the screen clip from the cam. It’s a bit scary but I pulled until it released.

Split clip from cam
Split clip and cam

We will going to use the plastic part with the screws so just unscrew it from the screen clip.

Removed the plastic part from the clip
Removed the plastic part from the clip

A standard tripod is just a 1/4″ screw. I found the following two.

I found the following two 1/4" screws that could work
One of these two could work

Here is how they would look. Not sure what the right one was used for but I think it would be easier to attach to the plastic part so I chose that one.

Trying out my options
Trying out my options

I’ll glue the plastic part with the metallic part so I’ll polish both to make the glue stick better.

Polish to make the glue stick
Polish to make the glue stick

Time to glue. I used a double sided tape but glue would work just as well.

Glue together
Glued together

Put the plastic part back to the webcam attach it to you tripod and we are done.

My modded webcam attached to a Gorillapod
My modded webcam attached to a Gorillapod

Easy way to convert videos using FFmpeg!

Update: I used FFmpeg for some conversions but I just found out Avidemux and it seems promising! Trying it right away!

Every once in a while I get my hands on a video file that I can’t play. Today when I wanted to watch a bouldering movie it failed. Not sure why. Maybe becuase my WLAN wasn’t fast enough to stream the huge HD file?

I looked around and found no nice tools to convert the movies. Either it was some shareware, adware or I just couldn’t find the download link on the ugly web site… I reverted and decided to try to use the command line tool FFmpeg to encode my videos to mpeg and be able to play them. It worked so good I’m amazed!

In Ubuntu FFmpeg is included in the distribution and is easy to install via Synaptic or Apt (sudo apt-get install ffmpeg). In Windows you can use this unofficial builds.

To make the conversion I used the following: ffmpeg -i OriginalVideo.mp4 -ab 128k -b 2000k EncodedVideo.mpg

Tip: If you are testing different settings for FFmpeg add -t 60 to encode only the first minute of the video.

FFmpeg is capable of creating videos with different codecs as well, but I didn’t need that currently so that will be a later exercise!